First Report of Hartmannella keratitis in a Cosmetic Soft Contact Lens Wearer in Iran.

  • Hoda Abedkhojasteh Department of Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Maryam Niyyati Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Firoozeh Rahimi Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mansour Heidari Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran AND Department of Medical Genetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Shohreh Farnia Department of Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mostafa Rezaeian Department of Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran AND Center for Research of Endemic Parasites of Iran (CREPI), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Keywords: Amoebic keratitis, Contact lens, Hartmannella, Iran

Abstract

Background:Poor hygiene will provide good condition for corneal infections by opportunistic free-living amoebae (FLA) in soft contact lens wearers. In the present study an amoebic keratitis due to Hartmannella has been recognized in a 22-year-old girl with a history of improper soft contact lens use. She had unilateral keratitis on her left eye. Her clinical signs were eye pain, redness, blurred vision and photophobia.The round cysts of free-living amoebae were identified in non-nutrient agar medium by light microscopy. These cysts were suspected to be Hartmannella using morphological criteria. A PCR assay has been confirmed that the round cysts were belonged to H. vermiformis.  

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How to Cite
1.
Abedkhojasteh H, Niyyati M, Rahimi F, Heidari M, Farnia S, Rezaeian M. First Report of Hartmannella keratitis in a Cosmetic Soft Contact Lens Wearer in Iran. Iran J Parasitol. 8(3):481-485.
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