Molecular Epidemiology of Cryptosporidiosis in Iranian Children, Tehran, Iran

  • N Taghipour Dept. of Parasitology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • E Nazemalhosseini- Mojarad Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • A Haghighi Dept. of Parasitology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • A Haghighi Dept. of Parasitology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • M Rostami- Nejad Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • S Romani Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • A Keshavarz Dept. of Parasitology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • M Alebouyeh Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • MR Zali Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran
Keywords: Genotypes, Subtypes, Cryptosporidium, GP60 gene, Children, Iran

Abstract

Background: Cryptosporidium is a worldwide protozoan parasite and one of the most common causes of infection and diarrhea in humans and cattle. The aim of the present study was determina­tion of subtypes of Cryptosporidium among children with diarrhea in Tehran by se­quence analysis of the highly polymorphic 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene.Methods: Fecal samples were collected from 794 diarrheic children. Initial identification of Crypto­spo­ridium was carried out on stool samples by Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast staining method. DNA was extracted from positive microscopically samples and Cryptosporidium genotypes and subtypes were determined, accordingly.Results: Out of 794 collected samples, 19 (2.40 %) were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts. Sequences analysis of GP60 gene showed that 17 (89.47 %) of the positive isolates were Crypto­spori­dium parvum and 2 (10.52 %) were C. hominis. All subtypes of C. parvum isolates belonged to allele families IIa (6/17) and IId (11/17). The most common allele in all 17 isolates belonged to IId A20G1a (41.18%). A22G1 (IF) subtype was detected in two C. hominis isolates of the chil­dren.Conclusion: The predominancy of C. parvum species (specially, IId A20G1a sub­type) in current study underlines the importance of zoonotic Cryptosporidium transmission in Iran.

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How to Cite
1.
Taghipour N, Nazemalhosseini- Mojarad E, Haghighi A, Haghighi A, Rostami- Nejad M, Romani S, Keshavarz A, Alebouyeh M, Zali M. Molecular Epidemiology of Cryptosporidiosis in Iranian Children, Tehran, Iran. Iran J Parasitol. 6(4):41-5.
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